Sun. Apr 14th, 2024

TLDR:

Four second-year Master of Fine Arts candidates at TCU organized an art exhibition called Refract, which showcases large sculptures, narrative photography, and interactive technology. The exhibition features recycled materials, challenges viewers to reconsider the mundane, and explores themes such as the history of the Bracero Program. The artworks invite audience engagement and interpretation, leaving room for personal experiences and perspectives.

Key Points:

  • Four second-year MFA candidates at TCU organize an art exhibition called Refract
  • The exhibition features large sculptures, narrative photography, and interactive technology
  • Austin Lewis creates a sculpture from recycled materials, challenging viewers to reconsider the mundane
  • Mckee Frazior’s interactive technology piece allows audience interaction without instruction
  • Raul Rodriguez focuses on the history of the Bracero Program through narrative photography
  • Elijah Ruhala’s three-dimensional piece explores relationships and leaves room for interpretation
  • The exhibition is open for viewing until February 17 at The Art Galleries at TCU

Four second-year Master of Fine Arts candidates at Texas Christian University (TCU) organized an art exhibition called Refract, showcasing their artwork at The Art Galleries at TCU. The exhibition features large sculptures, narrative photography, and interactive technology.

Austin Lewis, one of the candidates, crafted a sculpture in the front viewing room using recycled materials. According to a press release from The Art Galleries at TCU, Lewis’s sculptural and text-based works challenge viewers to reconsider the oddity and wonder in the mundane.

Mckee Frazior’s interactive technology piece, titled “Tech Knee Ohm,” allows the audience to engage with technology without any instruction. Using a panel of light switches, the audience can control a combination of words projected on a wall. Frazior explained that the piece allows communication with the computer through its native language.

Raul Rodriguez approached the theme of the exhibition differently, using narrative photography to focus on the history of the Bracero Program. The press release states that historical imagery is incorporated onto fabrics, while portraits of living Braceros symbolize the connections between the past and present within a western landscape backdrop.

Elijah Ruhala, a painting major, stepped out of his comfort zone for the exhibition and created a large, three-dimensional piece titled “The(ir) Art of Loving.” Inspired by one of his relationships, Ruhala used lumber, wax paper, and oil paint to create a space that loosely resembles a bathroom. The piece invites viewers to spend time with it but leaves room for individual interpretation and personal experiences.

The Refract exhibition is open for viewing at The Art Galleries at TCU until February 17.